Imperial Cleaning

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I sent the cost to him because it was the cheapest option of all. Ratings and Reviews 3 13 star ratings 3 reviews.

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Just email me a beer instead. Meditation is a form of mindfulness, but not the same thing. You can practice it all the time. Because, if you really think about it, all of your problems reside in the past or the future. Right now — this tiny sliver of a second constituting the present moment — is frankly too narrow to contain any problems. Feel the warmth of the water, the hardness of the plates, the slipperiness of the suds.

Hear the sounds of splashing water, and the squeak of sponge on dish. Which part of your foot hits the ground first? Which one is next? How do your legs feel as they alternately support and swing? What are your arms doing? As you do this, you may notice something: And then the next moment in time — still pretty good.

And the next one? String together enough of these mindful moments, and you get whole days, months and years. This way, you can get through anything. One of the best ways to cheer yourself up is to help cheer other people up. Hey, why do you think I do this stuff? So call up a friend, offer to listen, go deliver a hug in person, send them this list, and otherwise make yourself useful. Could be your family, your health, your car that gets you around.

Meditate on them, and deeply appreciate them in your life for 30sec each. Then go on with the rest of your day. Science shows that making this a daily or even weekly practice has measurable benefits for your long-term happiness. This really should have been at the top of the list; thanks to eagle-eyed reader Maria for bringing it to my attention.

All of the things I just mentioned are free and available to you right now. Would be great to see them. Just call This is a really good time to meet new people. Why do you think the most number of kids are born in August? Anyway, there are 6 sessions in total. The remaining 2 sessions will be in And remember, the course is evergreen.

All the material is online, and you can come back to it as often as you want, and join a live cohort whenever I have one. Hey, I hear ya. Things were probably rough even before they got rougher! We live in uncertain times. None of this is entirely new. And you know what? I have faith in you. And just so you can have even more faith in yourself, here are two resources straight from my secret stash that have been very useful to me:.

This is a daybook. You get an essay for every calendar day. The culmination of one love, one dream, one self, is the anonymous seed of the next. Mark Nepo has been through a lot cancer, divorce etc. As a result, he always writes from a place of deep vulnerability.

He also writes beautifully. No wonder Oprah went gaga over his book when she found out about it in You can either watch the livestream or go to watch from the archives right now for no charge perhaps the Nov 9 service will be of interest; lecture starts around He is one industrial-strength wallop of inspiration and the best living orator I know. The services are spiritually-oriented and non-denominational.

There are some recurring themes to his messages: Rev Michael was a pivotal part of starting my writing career 11 years ago. He is an extraordinarily helpful resource in times of trouble or joy. Meditation has been the single most transformative practice I have taken up. It has made me a calmer, less reactive, more thoughtful person. The first thing I do every morning is meditate, and I consider it the most important part of my day.

For someone deep into meditation, the list of teachers reads like the Team USA Basketball team roster: I am not exaggerating when I say these folks are the best at what they do:. Should you decide to purchase a package of the recordings, I receive a part of the proceeds.

Meditation is the life-changing practice, and I sincerely hope you can join me. Click here to sign up. Do you know what to do to make that pitch great every time? Or are you leaving those crucial turning points to chance?

I get a lot of letters from readers. There are common themes to these letters: Why do I behave this way? Why does he do that? Can I trust men? Is a long-term committed relationship even possible? But rarely does a letter hit all of those themes at the same time.

Martha, a very thoughtful 30yr old graduate student from Oregon sent me this letter recently. But I tend to come up with philosophical and existential questions that make everything harder. This expands to different areas in life, specifically relationships. Learning that I belong to the anxiously attached category helped me understand the painful break-ups and self-destructive patterns of thinking that followed. In my life these external resources have been: Along with that, I was exposed to continuous fights over parental infidelity, leading me to lose trust in men.

Since I was also criticized a lot, I always wanted to be more, which served me well but also with the downside of never being happy with who I was. I also wonder if I lack determination in my decision-making or reactions. I wanted to break the taboo of dating someone from a different socioeconomic status, which is why I started dating my boyfriend Bradley about a year ago. I often find myself analyzing everything my partner says, looking for its origin in order to discover the real him: These conversations alarm me and rev up my sympathetic nervous system to withdraw from trusting him in the long run.

But then again, I realize that this is still giving authority to external circumstances to keep me content. I never fear being left because someone smarter or kinder may come along.

I fear being left for a more attractive girl, or simply a different kind of beauty. I worry about getting old and losing physical beauty, but at the same time I realize that being a goddess is not a requirement to keep a man loyal. Many men cheat even when they have a goddess at home. What puzzles me is that even though I consider my mother a very beautiful woman though lacked in other areas and know that it did not stop my father from cheating, I take physical comments to heart and I worry about losing the field to younger girls.

I wonder if I have unconsciously always gone for the wrong guys to prove myself that men are not trustworthy. I want to be OK on my own, even if no man is ever going to be loyal to me for eternity. I want to stop worrying and being loved to be happy. Well, if some of what Martha brought up resonated with you, raise your hand. Lots of raised hands out there. Which brings me to the topic I want to talk about today: Prof Kristin Neff of the University of Texas at Austin is the pioneering researcher of self-compassion.

After all, who ever said you were supposed to be perfect? The most obvious one is recognizing our common humanity. And you would be wrong. Out there in Oregon, writing these thoughts to me, Martha is probably pretty sure that she is the only person in the world that has this constellation of challenges.

And yet, you the reader can probably identify with a bunch of them: Once you realize the rest of the world is also having these issues, it somehow becomes much easier to bear. That brings us to Principle 1, Self-kindness. Some folks — especially perfectionists — have somehow internalized that there is virtue in ripping into yourself. Besides, which part of you is ripping into which part of you? Are you slapping yourself in the face with your own hand, or elbowing yourself in the stomach?

Do you have any idea how weird that sounds? Stop that now before I call in the shrinks. And that brings us to Principle 3, Mindfulness. Just go ahead and feel it fully, without letting it be your whole existence and identity.

When you allow them to express fully, feelings fade over time. But if you resist them, they persist. So let them be, then let them go. Mindfulness is also about being fully present in the moment. This happens to be the antidote to overthinking or rumination, which is what this letter is doing a lot of.

Like many of you, Martha is a smart, highly-educated woman. And like many of you, she thinks a lot about things that have never happened and may never happen.

Some of these thoughts may turn into worries, which may become anxieties looming large enough to alter your daily behavior. For example, Martha talked about infidelity: What works is to do something else instead. For those of you who are in the Bay Area on Mon Oct 3, would love to see you at my live workshop. Please drop by and say hi! Christine Marie Mason is one of the most extraordinary people I know and one of my favorite humans. She has been an entrepreneur, CEO of 6 different companies, BA and MBA graduate from Northwestern University, organizer of nine TEDx events, a yoga teacher, artist, musician, mother of six fantastic kids, grandmother, and most recently, a prison peace mentor.

We met 15 years ago at a yoga retreat, so I thought I knew her pretty well by now. What I did not know was that when Christine was 12, her young mother was murdered and left in a cornfield.

She had her first child at 19, then again at 20, and still finished college and the MBA program. Her first husband eventually had a schizophrenic break and ended up losing his job and squandering all their money. Her second husband got cancer, then proceeded to cheat on her in spectacular fashion even while Christine was helping him recuperate. After a particularly long day in this spell of dot-com craziness, I was walking down a crowded street to catch a commuter train, when I saw my old friend Daniel.

Daniel always had a ready smile. He was self-contained, a loving husband and father and accomplished professionally—at that time he was CEO of a public company, making all manner of kitchen gadgets.

That night, he was shining. It looked to me like he had shed layers of himself; he was carrying no burden. He responded in an instant. Poise does not freak out over laundry, talk too much, go 90 miles an hour to make it to a meeting, or accidentally break things due to inattention.

After a great struggling 75 minutes of a vigorous athletic form of structured postures linked together by the breath we were practicing a form called Ashtanga yoga , the class arrived at Savasana , corpse pose, where we lay on our backs, arms outstretched, palms up, legs extended, letting all of our muscles relax, allowing our bones to sink into the floor, in a sort of half-state between sleeping and waking, a state of deep aware stillness.

Through the breathing, the rhythm, the turning inward of yoga—through the not turning to an external thing like whacking a tennis ball or working into the night —I found my first peace in long memory.

Yoga, as it has been popularized in the west, is often practiced with pumping music. People move fast and sweat and detox. If the connection between my feet and brain does not work, how am I going to connect to other people? Nor did I know where my organs were in my belly. My insides were like a black hole between my ribcage and my knees.

Can you feel where your liver is, unless it is in pain? After a while, I found that I could lift my arches and run an energetic current up my shins and thighs and ass and heart and right out the top of my head and back down again. The power I used in previous forms of athletics to release energy was something that could be channeled and leveraged inside of the body, to heal it and balance it, and restore equilibrium and clarity to my whole organism.

The yoga practice that was handed to me started a new kind of self-inquiry: Am I aware of my breath? Where am I looking? Where are my feet? Are all four corners of my feet on the ground? Are my arches lifted away? Where are my fingers? Are they evenly aligned or evenly spaced? Am I standing tall or leaning forwards or backwards? Where am I in space? How good is my proprioception: What am I actually feeling?

What is actually happening? It was a straight line to hyperawareness. I began to learn that the body has rising and falling energies, that when it gets certain inputs it releases certain chemicals, that there is a virtuous loop between the actions of the body and the chemicals that are released, and that this cycle is autonomic until we intervene and override it.

We can start to use our breathing and our thoughts to restructure which chemicals are getting released from our minds and into our bodies. We can reprogram ourselves, literally. Once I began, it was rapid-fire study. I went to my first class, and I knew I was going to return.

Eventually, I found a connection to divine source on that quiet, meditative, sweaty little mat, something I never quite got in any traditional church. That tiny studio, with a purple Om symbol painted on the wall, above a pizza parlor in the middle of Chicago, curtains blowing in, sirens and car horns below, became a holy place.

It was there that I discovered a sense of having a permeable body: I was made of the same stuff as everything else in the universe. I wanted to go deeper. In , I went on a retreat led by power yoga founder Baron Baptiste. His easygoing introduction to yoga philosophy, musical open laugh, softness, strength, humor and accessibility just made me happy. For example, once we stayed for a full 20 minutes in a hip opener known as frog: Somatic theory says we hold our painful memories in the body, and holding this position for this long had people in the room women especially , letting go and weeping at all the things held in the groin and hips.

I took his teacher training in Tulum, just to keep growing. Then I stumbled, or was led, into a month of teacher training in an intense, academic program that honored a deep Indian lineage, with Yogarupa Rod Stryker- and that training has continued apace for the last 15 years — from the yoga of sound, to contact yoga, to extensive breath and tantric energy work, to studying Sanskrit texts — it is an unending investigation.

By investigating the body, I began to investigate the mind also, and then even deeper into relationships. Once, early on, I was holding a yoga position called side plank for a long time. This position requires the body to form a long, firm, extended board, placing one hand on the floor, the other to the ceiling, and balancing between the side of the bottom foot and the palm of the hand, holding the belly snug and the hips high.

It can be rigorous. My arms started shaking; my balance was challenged. I invite you to look at your reaction to that. Are you feeling proud, or maybe the inverse: How can you be kind to yourself in this moment, play your edge, and take responsibility for your experience?

How much are your own thoughts and reactions responsible for your own suffering? If side plank was hard, the other big practice, seated meditation, was harder. Sitting still, harboring a quiet mind, initially felt impossible. Even two minutes of meditation felt interminable.

Every part of me resisted. To make it easier, all kinds of techniques were offered: Watch your breath right where it enters and exits the nostrils, imagine a flame, say a mantra.

But it was all just practice to do one thing: To become a watcher of my own thoughts. But if I am watching my thoughts, who is thinking the thoughts? These thoughts must be separately constructed. I am not my thoughts. And if I am not my thoughts, I can un-identify and manipulate them to a better outcome. Lo and behold, this was true. By watching and stopping unhelpful patterns of thinking, I learned that I could change the day-to-day experience of life in my body.

Well, maybe one person. For example, I learned to not judge a rising emotion or thought — just to see it as neutral energy. If all thoughts and actions are only energy, neither positive nor negative, I can transmute it. I can remove the negative element, and just use the energy. If an unsettling thought would arise, I would ask myself, what can I do other than sit here or numb out through work or busyness or sex or distraction? What can I do to not numb out, to really feel and then leverage the emotion?

Can I channel it into awareness, creative force, or even just let it pass through me? Most of the productivity and creativity in the last decade has been the result of having learned to transmute whatever intense emotion is coming up into an activity or action that is in touch with experience, rather than pushing it away.

Now, if I have disturbing thoughts, I can choose to be matter of fact: With yoga, the recovery time from these disturbances, delusions and illusions and suffering is shorter. It takes hardly any time anymore to come back, maybe a minute or two of breathing and —there it is! This is especially useful in navigating the daily kind of potential offenses in traffic or in the supermarket parking lot — is this my best self acting here? Yoga roots me in a life-giving and life-affirming place, rather than the old soup of pervasive inadequacy.

It has made me strong, mentally and physically. The yogic ideal is strength and suppleness, being rooted yet able to reach, the perfect combination of grounded and flexible. There is an Indian fable that puts it sweetly: Ananta is strong enough to support the world, yet soft enough to be a couch for the gods.

I started going to class to feel better, and fell in love with the practice, and it gave me back my life. That translates into bringing others along with you.

Whatever you know, you are obligated to pass on: Those who know must teach. If you know, you owe. Teaching yoga, helping one person at a time find the tools and technologies to achieve the Poise of the Soul, is a great gift. I sometimes teach Vinyasa flow classes. Sometimes, I teach extremely stiff people, and witness what it means to grow old without being connected to your body—it is not for the faint of heart.

But I also see the relief they get from a single new insight or opening into a joint or the breath. It makes me recall my very first practice, and remember each time a teacher gave me a new posture or an insight. It reawakens gratitude and it gifts me with joyful learning. If you enjoyed what you just read, download a page excerpt at http: Click here to sign up and get automatically reminded of when it happens.

Men always seem to hit on foreign women at import stores. Walk around Shibuya and make eye contact with men, trying to get nanpa-d. You would be surprised by how well this works. As a result, a lot of times their communication can be unclear or vague. This comes through in dating because Japanese girls are really flaky and often cancel at the last minute. In our experience Japanese guys are far less likely to flake on dates.

When do you know if a Japanese girl will go on a date with you? When she shows up! Approaching — use a lot of facial expressions and gestures, be animated — engagement without just language! A really common mistake that most guys make when they communicate cross culturally is they think their subtle, razor sharp wit and wordplay will impress. Unfortunately, just getting the basic meaning across can be challenging enough. You never know how big the language barrier is, and where exactly the gaps in vocabulary and grammar are, so let your gestures and facial expressions do as much of the work for you as possible.

Use this to your advantage to communicate more meaning by exaggerating your facial expressions. Use gestures like a mime to act out what it is you mean as much as possible. While Japanese society is relatively open about sex, it is still not usually an end in and of itself.

Women are often just as interested in consummating the relationship as men. Japan, despite is apparent modernity, is a traditional culture. There was no real sexual revolution with women burning their bras and demanding that they be able to sleep around freely without judgement.

A lot of books, movies, and other media still give the impression that sex is just about physical release. For some Japanese women, there is a divide between sex for pleasure and sex deployed for specific purposes, be it, locking down a boyfriend, satisfying the husband, or creating children. The role of sex has a lot to do with the relationship between the people involved. Japanese girls will never call you, message you, ask for your number, suggest a meet, or do anything else that implies that they are interested in you other than be good company.

In the West, dating is far more a mutual thing. Japan is still a traditional place and most girls would be embarrassed to seem obvious about their interest. Available in Canada Shop from Canada to buy this item. Or, get it for Kobo Super Points! In this series View all Book 9.

Snowed in With the Alien Doctor: Ratings and Reviews 3 13 star ratings 3 reviews. Yes No Thanks for your feedback! Lobo has found his mate in Veronica and now his 2 brothers are up for grabs and man do they have stuff to grab! But these 2 hunky aliens already have their eyes set on their potential mates now all they have to do is convince them. Brooke Singleton is a highly professional skilled martial arts instructor, but at one time she was in the military and it has scarred her, she has terrible nightmares because of the lives she failed to protect.

She did a double take when she set eyes on that alien hunk Conan, but she can't dump her garbage on the poor guy, what kind of impression would he have of human females? Besides she's got enough problems like figuring out what she's going to do about the impending eviction. Conan can't help himself every time he sees Brooke, she is the one he has chosen as his mate, but she carries a deep seated pain that he is determined to remove from her life with his special ability Besides when he helps her maybe she'll be able to keep her building.

All he has to do is win her trust and convince her to let him in then he can work on convincing her that she should accept his mate request. Black has done it again: I didn't want to stop whenever I had to, then after I finished, I was left craving more- as usual ; lol Brook is the hand to hand combat trainer for the police. She suffers PTSD and something that happened here.

Her dream is to open a gym for other vets and the kids that live nearby. The problem is Henderson is shutting them down and the building brook, her two friends and 3 aliens from Aerie live in. Conan is from Aerie and spent his life in a gas form until he came to earth now to be fully human he needs a mate.

He's picked Brook but can he help her save her building, get the gym and have her fall for him too? Sweet read with so fun twists. I love the characters and how they interact with each other. It caught my attention fast and kept it. Syfy fans will love it. Voluntarily reviewed and I honestly loved it.

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